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5 Ways To Ease MRI Claustrophobia

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5 Ways To Ease MRI Claustrophobia

One of the biggest concerns for patients undergoing an MRI is claustrophobia. Whether or not you suffer from claustrophobia on a daily basis, scan anxiety can occur and make MRI's more stressful process. Fortunately, at Northeast Nebraska Imaging we specialize in Open MRI technology which offers more room for claustrophobic patients. If you are still concerned about your MRI, here are a few more tips that will ease your claustrophobia

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Summer Health: Preventing and Treating Mosquito Bites

Summer is here again and that means more time outdoors! While you are outside and taking part in activities - like camping and bonfires - it’s important to protect yourself from mosquitos and other insects. Mosquitos have been known to spread diseases such as West Nile virus, Zika, Malaria, and Yellow Fever. These risks are increased if you’re spending time in tropical or foreign destinations.  

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Statistics and Early Prevention of Colon Cancer

Many people do not know a lot about colon cancer. However, we believe this needs to be changed. The twelve months in every year are full of national health awareness days, weeks, and months. In 2000, Bill Clinton designated March as the official National Colon Cancer Awareness Month. Ever since that day it has snowballed, increasing in popularity and becoming a rallying point for colon cancer patients, survivors, caregivers, and advocates all over the U.S.

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MRI: A Look at How Far We've Come

Magnetic Resonance Imaging technology has been around since the 1970s, and was originally designed as a way to view the insides of a body through the use of magnetic imaging. Over the years, however, the uses for MRI have continued to evolve, and it’s now one of the most diverse procedures available. Continue reading article>

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Tell Us How You Really Feel

t goes without saying that we have the best patients out there. Hands down. No arguing. It’s a fact.  Every week we’re amazed by the interactions that we have and by the people that we meet. Every week there’s a patient who manages to put a smile on our faces or inspire us to be better. Every week there’s a new reason to keep coming back to work, and that reason is you. We aren’t kidding when we say that we literally could not do what we do without help from each and every one of you. This year, we want to make a bigger effort to celebrate our patients. The moments we share with you, the experiences that you have at our center, and the encouragement you give us that helps keep us going! Continue reading article>

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Why That Extra Slice of Cake May Actually Hurt You

What gives you cancer? Every day the answer changes. Not wearing sunscreen used to be a surefire way to increase your risk of cancer, then within years there were claims that wearing sunscreen was actually what put you at risk for developing cancer. Studies come out every week, each one with different results. What you should eat, what you shouldn’t eat…it’s impossible to know. Cancer is a difficult disease, and it’s one that is still largely a mystery to doctors today, even after years of study. There are a lot of mixed opinions, conflicting studies, and differing viewpoints. All we can do is keep up with the latest news and hope that it helps.

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Walking You Through a Breast MRI

The American College of Radiology recently composed a list of guidelines to follow when considering a breast MRI“Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast is a useful tool for the detection and characterization of breast disease, assessment of local extent of the disease, evaluation of treatment response, and guidance for biopsy and localization.” Continue reading article>

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No, You're Not Hearing Things...

What is that sound the MRI machine is making? If this is your 1st MRI, you may be unaware of a very distinct noise the MRI machine makes. Due to rapid pulses of gradients, the coils are rapidly switched on and off and the gradients in the machine vibrate to make a constant, semi-loud or almost banging sound. Continue reading article>

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Help Your Kids Sit Still Through an MRI

Help Your Kids Sit Still Through an MRI

 Recently reported by Jude Children’s Research Hospital and published in Pediatric Radiology, experts have developed a new way to get kids to stay still during MRI scans.  Sometimes children have to be sedated undergo an MRI scan, because it is just hard for children to sit still for that amount of time.  However, this new method will help children as young as 5 years old successfully receive MRIs.  Jude Children’s ResearchHospital has created an intervention program for children to go through before they go get their MRI.

The program is created by Child Life Program at St. Jude, and it teaches the children and their parents what to expect during the MRI.  They tell children what they could think about during the exams to distract and appease them.  They worked with the children and parents to discuss the most effective ways to get them stay still, since all children are different and require different methods.

“Some patients chose to listen to music or to squeeze a ball to help them remember not to move.  Some patients had the option of watching movies or having parents in the room with them during the tests,” Katherine Cejda said, a specialist at St. Jude and author of the study.

This study was conducted on children with sickle cell disease, and since they have to get MRIs to examine their livers and brains, going under anesthesia is unsafe.  St. Jude’s examined 71 patients between the ages of 5-12 and found that the patients were 8 times more likely to make it through the entire scan without undergoing anesthesia than those children who did not go through the intervention program.  91% of the children who participated in the classes had a successful MRI, whereas only 71% of the children who did not go through the program made it through the scan successfully.

Although this is only the first trial performed on children suffering from sickle cell disease, Cejda explains that there are many other studies and programs that have been done around the U.S. focused on intervention programs for young kids needing MRIs.

This is an extremely important study for sickle cell patients especially due to the daner associated with anesthesia for these patients.  Anesthesia can lead to dehydration, lowered body temperature, and drops in blood-oxygen levels.  Dehydration is especially dangerous for sickle cell patients, because it can make the cells build up, causing harsh pain and resulting in pneumonia-like symptoms.

Normally, if the sickle cell patient does have to go under anesthesia they are required to stay the night in the hospital before the procedure, so that they can consume enough fluids and might even require a blood transfusion.

The program is also beneficial because it may cut costs for hospitals, which helps for the hospital, the insurance companies, and most importantly the patients.

Although this research’s focus was on sickle cell patients, it can also help children with other needs undergo an MRI scan in an easier fasion!  No parent wants to resort to their kid going under anesthesia, so share this study with your family and friends!

To read the whole article on sickle cell MRI studies, click the attached link.

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