Viewing entries tagged
MRI experience

5 Ways To Ease MRI Claustrophobia

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5 Ways To Ease MRI Claustrophobia

One of the biggest concerns for patients undergoing an MRI is claustrophobia. Whether or not you suffer from claustrophobia on a daily basis, scan anxiety can occur and make MRI's more stressful process. Fortunately, at Northeast Nebraska Imaging we specialize in Open MRI technology which offers more room for claustrophobic patients. If you are still concerned about your MRI, here are a few more tips that will ease your claustrophobia

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How To Make Your Child Feel Comfortable During An MRI

An MRI can be a stressful experience at any age, but it’s especially stressful if your child needs one. Even though it’s a completely safe exam, it may be hard to help your child overcome the fear of entering the MRI machine. To ensure your child has the best experience possible, we have provided some tips to comfort your child during their MRI.

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How to Maintain Healthy Bones

Our bones are the framework of our bodies. Having healthy bones are crucial to the health of our body as a whole. More and more, our bones are being neglected and we are seeing elderly patients have osteoporosis at a faster rate than normal. Fight back osteoporosis, and use these tips to maintain a healthy bone structure. Continue reading article> 

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How long do MRI scans last?

Patients are always asking questions. One of the most commonly asked questions, and apprehensions that patients have about MRIs, is how long do these scans last? Most patients want MRI’s to go smoothly, and efficiently. With different types of MRI’s come with different scan times. Continue reading article>

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Walking You Through a Breast MRI

The American College of Radiology recently composed a list of guidelines to follow when considering a breast MRI“Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast is a useful tool for the detection and characterization of breast disease, assessment of local extent of the disease, evaluation of treatment response, and guidance for biopsy and localization.” Continue reading article>

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No, You're Not Hearing Things...

What is that sound the MRI machine is making? If this is your 1st MRI, you may be unaware of a very distinct noise the MRI machine makes. Due to rapid pulses of gradients, the coils are rapidly switched on and off and the gradients in the machine vibrate to make a constant, semi-loud or almost banging sound. Continue reading article>

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Tweet Your Way To A Better MRI Experience

Twitter is a pretty awesome thing. It’s a platform that lets us communicate with our friends, share what we’re doing, express how we feel, comment on current events, and incite laughter. It’s where we can (and usually do) share about absolutely anything and everything we are experiencing.

It turns out that sometimes this information can actually be useful, and in ways you probably wouldn’t ever imagine. Researchers and doctors around the world are turning to Twitter to learn more about the MRI experience from a patient perspective, and they’re using what they find to change their MRI process.

It all started when Jonathan Hewis, an investigator from Charles Sturt University in Australia, decided to start analyzing tweets related to MRI. He found that patients, friends, and family were all using Twitter to share their thoughts and feelings about many different aspects of the procedure including the MRI appointment, scan experience, and diagnosis.

Some people tweeted sentiments of support to their friends who were having MRI’s, some patients used Twitter to praise their healthcare team or talk about their MRI results, and many others tweeted specifics about what they enjoyed or disliked about their MRI experience. There were also an overwhelming amount of “MRI gown selfies” added to the mix.

So why do doctors want you to tweet about your MRI experience? Because it helps provide insight that they wouldn’t normally be able to get. It’s a way for them to understand what patients like and dislike about the process, and it can give them tips for changes to make that will improve patient experience.

For example, one of the biggest things that Hewis found patients were complaining about was the fact that they weren’t able to pick what type of music they listened to during the scan, something that’s such a small fix and goes a long way towards making the experience more enjoyable for the patient. Many centers, like our, have responded to feedback like this, and allow patients to bring in their own ipod or CD of music to listen to during the scan.

The fact of the matter is, we want you to have the best MRI experience you can possibly have, and if there are things we can do to help make that happen then we want to do them! So if you had a bad experience or if you think there’s room for improvement to the MRI process, tweet about it. Chances are someone will see it and take action. You can share your experience by tweeting to us @openmrinebraska.

You can read more about the findings of the original research on Biospace

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