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Northeast Nebraska Imaging

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How to actually keep your New Years resolution

We all know the drill. A New Year comes around, and we are all ecstatic about the resolutions we’ve made to ourselves. You start out the first month strong, keeping your resolution on track. Then, come February, you kind of let it slip through the cracks. This happens to so many people when it comes to resolutions. Don’t let this year be the same, keep your resolutions with these 3 simple steps. Continue reading article>

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Help Your Kids Sit Still Through an MRI

Help Your Kids Sit Still Through an MRI

 Recently reported by Jude Children’s Research Hospital and published in Pediatric Radiology, experts have developed a new way to get kids to stay still during MRI scans.  Sometimes children have to be sedated undergo an MRI scan, because it is just hard for children to sit still for that amount of time.  However, this new method will help children as young as 5 years old successfully receive MRIs.  Jude Children’s ResearchHospital has created an intervention program for children to go through before they go get their MRI.

The program is created by Child Life Program at St. Jude, and it teaches the children and their parents what to expect during the MRI.  They tell children what they could think about during the exams to distract and appease them.  They worked with the children and parents to discuss the most effective ways to get them stay still, since all children are different and require different methods.

“Some patients chose to listen to music or to squeeze a ball to help them remember not to move.  Some patients had the option of watching movies or having parents in the room with them during the tests,” Katherine Cejda said, a specialist at St. Jude and author of the study.

This study was conducted on children with sickle cell disease, and since they have to get MRIs to examine their livers and brains, going under anesthesia is unsafe.  St. Jude’s examined 71 patients between the ages of 5-12 and found that the patients were 8 times more likely to make it through the entire scan without undergoing anesthesia than those children who did not go through the intervention program.  91% of the children who participated in the classes had a successful MRI, whereas only 71% of the children who did not go through the program made it through the scan successfully.

Although this is only the first trial performed on children suffering from sickle cell disease, Cejda explains that there are many other studies and programs that have been done around the U.S. focused on intervention programs for young kids needing MRIs.

This is an extremely important study for sickle cell patients especially due to the daner associated with anesthesia for these patients.  Anesthesia can lead to dehydration, lowered body temperature, and drops in blood-oxygen levels.  Dehydration is especially dangerous for sickle cell patients, because it can make the cells build up, causing harsh pain and resulting in pneumonia-like symptoms.

Normally, if the sickle cell patient does have to go under anesthesia they are required to stay the night in the hospital before the procedure, so that they can consume enough fluids and might even require a blood transfusion.

The program is also beneficial because it may cut costs for hospitals, which helps for the hospital, the insurance companies, and most importantly the patients.

Although this research’s focus was on sickle cell patients, it can also help children with other needs undergo an MRI scan in an easier fasion!  No parent wants to resort to their kid going under anesthesia, so share this study with your family and friends!

To read the whole article on sickle cell MRI studies, click the attached link.

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So What Is An MRI And What Kinds Are There?

Magnetic Resonance Imaging, or an MRI, is an advanced diagnostic imaging procedure that makes detailed images of inside the body. These images are created by using a powerful magnet, radiowaves and a computer to process the images. MRI’s are useful for physicians to diagnose diseases and abnormalities in their early stages so that effective treatments can be given to patients. There are two major types of MRI machines used across the country, open and closed. Closed MRI’s are donut shaped and enclosed on all sides. On the other hand, open MRI’s are open on all four sides and much quieter than the traditional closed MRI, letting patients feel at ease during their procedure. The images below depict the spatial differences between open and closed MRI’s.

 

There are a variety of benefits that open MRI’s can offer. Open machines are able to accommodate a range of patients, including those that are handicapped or large. All patients have a greater sense of comfort in the spacious open machines, which may assist in reducing fears of claustrophobia or confinement. Children who are fearful of doctor’s offices can be comforted during scanning by a parent. Most importantly, open MRI’s provide patients with a greater range of motion and positioning, which can help with getting the best image to meet the needs of what is being tested for.

For more information on MRI services offered at Northeast Nebraska Open MRI Imaging visit our website

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SPOTLIGHT: TJ Froehlich

Northeast Nebraska Imaging is proud to highlight TJ Froehlich.  TJ is the lead technologist at Northeast Nebraska Imaging and is board certified.  He is one of the friendliest people we know and has been with us for over five years.  TJ is very informative and always tries to help anyone that may have a question. 

Our favorite thing about TJ is how he interacts with the patients.  As a technologist, your job is to operate the MRI equipment and position the patients correctly for the requested diagnostic images, but TJ goes above and beyond with his patients.  TJ will do everything he possibly can to make the patients feel as comfortable as possible.  With patients that tend to be the most nervous or anxious, TJ will talk to them throughout the entire scan trying to eliminate their fears. 

Next time you need an MRI come to Northeast Nebraska Imaging and ask for TJ as your technologist!  We are proud to have such amazing technologists at our center!

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Follow-up: Warm Hearts & Warm Hands Project in Norfolk, Nebraska

Back in November Northeast Nebraska Imaging put out donation boxes in their office and other locations around the Norfolk area.  We would like to thank all of the practices and clinics who took part in our Warm Heart and Warm Hands Campaign; we would not have been able to accomplish this without them.  We also want to thank all of the patients that helped donate and spread the word. 

We are ecstatic that we were able to double our collection from last year.  In total we were able to collect 263 hats, mittens, coats, scarves and gloves plus an additional dollar amount raised to purchase more warm clothing.  All of the donations received were given to Bright Horizons which is a non-profit organization which helps domestic violence and sexual assault victims and their families. 

The locations with boxes were: Davis & Kassmeier Chiropractic;Alegent Creighton Health Plainview Clinic; Dr. David Johnson Osmond Clinic; Diabetes & Wellness Clinic; Urgent Care of Norfolk; Woodland Park Medical Clinic; Battle Creek Family Medicine; Pierce Family Medicine; Avera Medical Clinic Pierce; MyPainDoc; Foot & Ankle Doctors, PC; and of course,  Northeast Nebraska Imaging.

Again, thank you to everyone that donated.  Northeast Nebraska Imaging is proud to be a part of such a great cause and work with a great organization like Bright Horizons.  Many thanks to the other healthcare providers in Norfolk for their help!

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MRI Studies are Able to Pick Up Cardiac Tissue Damage from Silent Heart Attacks Better than Traditional EKGs

MRI Studies are Able to Pick Up Cardiac Tissue Damage from Silent Heart Attacks Better than Traditional EKGs

 A silent heart attack is an attack that occurs, but the person is unaware they are having a heart attack.  In a study from Iceland, scientists found that twice as many people have had a silent heart attack than a full-on heart attack.  This study was reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Andrew Arai, a cardiologist at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute in Bethesda, Maryland and author, said that it is helpful when you know that someone has had a heart attack before, therefore, you can treat them more aggressively and be more aware of outliers.

During the study, scientists chose 670 people from Iceland to watch, however the patients were randomly selected and the median age was 76.  266 people were chosen because they had diabetes.  Their medical history showed that 91% had a previous heart attack, however, after testing the MRI revealed that 157 (72 with diabetes) had clear signs of cardiac tissue damage from a previous silent heart attack, whereas the EKG only picked up 46 cases (15 with diabetes).  Only some people were detected by both tests.

The participants in the study, on average, were not overweight and did not have dangerously high cholesterol levels.  Renu Virmani, a cardiac pathologist, was not surprised that many people have silent heart attacks, for example, those with diabetes often do not feel much pain.  “Their nervous system isn’t sensing as much as it should,” Arai said.

If more people knew they had a silent heart attack they would be more apt to pay attention to their risk factors and make a change.  The people who have silent heart attacks are less likely than those with diagnosed heart attacks to be taking aspirin to lower blood clotting or statins to lower their LDL cholesterol.  People who have had a silent heart attack are just as likely to have coronary calcium buildup, early signs of heart disease and are more apt to pass away within 6 subsequent years of monitoring, as patients with traditional documented heart attacks.

The study demonstrates the need for more MRI cardiology testing so that people can diminish further heart damage.  The study shows that people need to pay more attention to the risks of heart disease and not just smoking, diabetes, or high cholesterol; they need to pay attention to factors like family history.

Although this study shows that MRIs are more accurate than EKGs the National Institute of Health, is not advocating cardiac MRIs for healthy individuals or individuals who do not have any symptoms of heart disease or risks of heart disease.

For more information on this study, check out the article here.

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Go Red for Women: Ladies Night Out!

Go Red for Women: Ladies Night Out!

 The 9th Annual Norfolk Go Red for Women event will take place this upcoming Wednesday, September 26th, 2012, at Divots DeVent Center beginning at 5 p.m.  The Divots DeVent Center is located at 4200 W Norfolk Avenue.  The event is being brought to you by the American Heart Association and their sponsors.

The night is sure to be informational and motivational, featuring the motivational speaker, Holly Huffman, as the keynote speaker followed by a survivor speaker.  The event will also include a silent and live auction.  Many people from the health and fitness industry will be in attendance to show women how to make certain lifestyle changes and how those changes will save their lives.

Holly Hoffman was born and raised in Eureka, SD and manages a cattle ranch with her husband Charlie, who serves as a representative in the state legislature.  Holly was on season 21 of “Survivor Nicaragua” where she was the last woman standing and came in 4th place.  Today, she travels around the world making appearances and motivational speeches to a variety of organizations and schools.  Robin Spence will be the survivor speaker of the night and she is going to share how she thought strokes only happened to “older people”, until it happened to her.  Hearing her story might have a big enough impact on you to take actions to help save your own life.

Go Red for Women’s mission is to fight heart disease in women.  They want to bring awareness to women and show them how serious heart disease is in our community.  While trying to inspire and inform women of this disease, they team up with health and fitness professionals to teach women concrete steps that they can take to become healthier individuals and lower their risk for heart disease.

Heart Disease is the number 1 killer in women, killing 1 in 3 women a year.  This means every minute, a woman dies from heart disease.  Inactivity, obesity, high blood pressure, cigarette smoking, high cholesterol, and diabetes are the top risk factors contributing to heart disease.  Inactivity and obesity are the two highest factors causing heart disease.

However, the good news is about 80 % of heart disease and stroke can be prevented.  The American Heart Association made “Life’s Simple 7” list with 7 ways to help prevent heart disease and stroke.  The 7 things you can do for yourself are: be active, control cholesterol, eat better, manage blood pressure, lose weight, reduce blood sugar, and stop smoking.  Although some of them aren't easy changes to make, at least they are changes that you can control to save your own life.

Northeast Nebraska Imaging is proud to show support for the American Heart Association and their Go Red Women’s Night out Event.  For more information or to reserve your spot at the event please visit here.

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What are MRI’s even used for?

What are MRI’s even used for?

 Although many people are familiar with the term MRI, many do not know what a MRI really does compared to x-rays, ct scans, or ultra sounds.  Many view them as virtually the same, but that couldn't be further from the truth! We are here to help!

MRI stands for magnetic resonance imaging and doctors will order many different MRI’s for many different reasons.  Most people will get confused on whether they need an MRI, CT scan, or x-ray, so here is a tool to help you determine what you would need an MRI for and some things that doctors use them for monitoring purposes.

Doctor’s order MRI’s to be performed on the following areas if a patient needs health monitoring:

  • Organs of the chest and abdomen (liver, billary tract, kidneys, spleen, bowel, pancreas, and adrenal glands)
  • Pelvic Organs (both male and female reproductive organs)
  • Blood Vessels Breasts

Doctor’s also use MRI’s to help diagnose patient needs:

  • Tumors (in the chest, abdomen, or pelvis)
  • Certain types of heart problems
  • Blockages or enlargements of blood vessels
  • Diseases of the liver, small intestine, colon, rectum, and anus
  • Cysts and solid tumors in the kidneys and parts of the urinary tract
  • Tumors and abnormalities of the reproductive organs
  • Causes of Pelvic Pain in women
  • Suspected uterine congenital abnormalities in women evaluating infertility
  • Breast Cancer and Breast implants
  • Fetal assessment in pregnant women

For more information on MRI’s or MRI Imaging Centers.

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Spotlight Dr. Colligan

Spotlight Dr. Robert Colligan

Dr. Robert Colligan recently separated from Midwest Health Partners to start his own private practice, Foot & Ankle Doctors, PC.  Currently, Colligan serves patients as the sole physician at Foot & Ankle Doctors, PC located in Norfolk, NE.  Being located within Norfolk and the surrounding areas for over fifteen years, many would consider Colligan to be a valuable member of the Norfolk Medical Community.

Dr. Colligan, being a highly trained podiatric physician and surgeon is hoping that this new venture will prove successful.  His two main goals are providing the highest quality of healthcare to his patients and being able to treat all his patients’ needs.  Two of Dr. Colligan’s specialties are both conservative and surgical treatments, where he uses the conservative treatments to avoid unnecessary surgeries.

“I know the latest trends and technologies available, and I can make quicker decisions on where to steer the practice in the future,” Dr. Colligan said.  Colligan feels that he has a strong influence in his field in the Norfolk area and believes that his own practice will give him more control to care for his patients.

The new space that Colligan chose for his new practice is big enough for expansion in the future.  Colligan believes that in the future he will expand, because there is a huge demand in the area for the care that he provides in the podiatry field.  Although he looks forward to the future of expansion, he is taking it one day at a time, and enjoying his new practice.

Dr. Robert Colligan is a highly-skilled podiatric physician and surgeon and keeps expanding his knowledge in the field by attending many conferences around the country.  After receiving his doctorate of podiatric medicine from the college of podiatric medicine and surgery in Des Moines, Iowa, he went on to complete multiple residencies.  Today, Dr. Colligan is well-known in the Norfolk community for his expertise in the field and with his new practice underway he is able to provide his patients with the latest technologies available in the podiatry field.

Northeast Nebraska Imaging is proud to highlight such a prominent physician.  For more information on Dr. Colligan and his practice, please call 402-371-4690.  Their office is located at 110 N 37th Street Ste 101NorfolkNE68701.

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PATCH health fair coming up!

September 14th marks the opening of the 20th anniversary of the PATCH health fair!  The fair will run September 14th-15th at the Cox Activity Center on the Northeast Community College campus.  PATCH stands for Planned Approach to Community Health.  The health fair will be decorated with patchwork quilts to symbolize the importance of each vendor participating in the fair for being the essential pieces to a healthy lifestyle.

The PATCH health fair is meant to provide quality information to the general public about their health, promoting healthier lifestyle choices.  Over two days, there will be various activities, health screenings, and educational exhibits.  Many people do not visit their doctors frequently enough to get certain necessary screenings done.  The health fair will help these gain access to these screenings and quality physicians, helping them keep an eye on their health, because it is important!

This year’s health fair is exciting because it is the 20th anniversary!  Everyone working on this year’s fair is extremely excited and hopes to make it the best fair yet.  The vendors are strongly encouraged to decorate their booths this year and show how their company or business is promoting a healthy lifestyle and why they keep the PATCH health fair expanding year after year.

A huge benefit of this year’s fair is the free health screenings you can get.  The screenings include; blood pressure, vision, hearing, body mass index (BMI), height, weight, and more.  There will be over 40 different exhibitors at the event with different activities and special information.

All exhibitors are selected by the unique and interactive ways they promote community health, so visitors can be sure to meet with some high quality care providers.    So, if you have nothing to do September 14th or 15th, go check out the PATCH Health Fair and celebrate 20 years of Norfolk Area Health.

For more information about PATCH health fair go here.

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Spotlight: Dr. Stephen Smith

Dr. Stephen R. Smith is a Board Certified Orthopedic Surgeon serving the area of Norfolk. Nebraska. Having graduated in 1976 from the Welsh National School of Medicine within Wales’ Cardiff University, Dr. Smith has gained over 30 years of experience in orthopedics.

One of Dr. Smith’s specialties is total knee replacement, which utilizes the Signature Personalized Patient Care System technology. In this procedure, an MRI is used to survey the knee. This three-dimensional view of the patient’s knee allows a physician to create a custom fit replacement that is more accurately sized and longer lasting. Instead of fitting implants inside the thigh and shinbone, this procedure uses a custom fit implant that is placed directly on top of these bones. Patients can expect this less invasive procedure to last up to 25 years with a shorter recovery time.

Dr. Smith practices with

Norfolk Medical Group

, L.L.C., alongside his NCCPA Certified Physician’s Assistant, Sean Craig. We are pleased to serve as an

extension

of his practice, providing diagnostic imaging for his patients in need. For more information on Dr. Stephen Smith and where his practice is located, please visit

Norfolk Medical Group

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Norfolk and Northeast Nebraska Imaging prepare for Relay for Life

Tonight at 6 PM Norfolk’s Relay For Life event will kick off with its opening ceremony at the Johnny Carson Track and Field. Participants have been fundraising and planning the event for months, drawing over 450 participants, 42 teams and over $74,000. Relay For Life is the main fundraising event for the American Cancer Society to raise awareness, help those that have been affected and support research. The event has been conducted in over 5000 communities throughout the United States and is said to have raised over 3 billion since its inception in 1986. During Relay events, participants will assemble teams that camp out within the community. At these locations, team members take turns walking or running around a track for up to 24 hours, symbolizing how cancer never sleeps. The Norfolk Relay will last from 6PM until the closing ceremony at 7:00 AM on June 2nd. The event will also include a Survivor’s Lap at 6:15 PM, a Luminaria Ceremony at 9:30 PM and the Fight Back Ceremony at 10:00 PM. As the community unites for this cause, Northeast Nebraska Imaging Open MRI is proud to participate in the event and be a Copper sponsor.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/user/amercancersociety?v=TW3MY9lLfFc]

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