Viewing entries tagged
obesity

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Adult Obesity Cause for Concern Too

The CDC determines obesity based on Body Mass Index (BMI), which is calculated using a person’s height and weight. For most people, this also correlates to their amount of body fat. An adult with a BMI of 30 and above is considered obese and an adult with a BMI between 25 and 29.9 is considered overweight.

The CDC shows that 13 states have a population of at least 30% of obese adults, up from 12 states two years ago. Those states are Alabama, Arkansas, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, and West Virginia.

The rest of the country isn’t faring much better with 41 states having at least 25% obesity and all 50 above 20%.

Nebraska’s adult obese population is at 28.6%.

These numbers are in stark contrast to 30 years ago when no state was above 15% obesity and 20 years ago when no state was above 20%. Even just six years ago, only Mississippi was above 30%.

Surprisingly, there is a positive in the statistics. With the exception of Arkansas, every state is holding steady in their obese populations. While obesity isn’t going down, it isn’t increasing considerably either.

We probably don’t have to reiterate the health repercussions of obesity and overweight. (If you are looking for a refresher, the CDC provides one here.) Let’s instead focus on what we can do to decrease the prevalence of obesity and overweight.

Firstly, we can create a culture of change, something is already being promoted by initiatives such as First Lady Michelle Obama and her Let’s Move! initiative and Nebraska’s state initiatives.

As communities, we can support these initiatives and push for sidewalks and walking paths, and maintain clean park to promote activity. And as families and individuals, we can promote physical activity and healthier eating choices, like more fruits and vegetables and fewer soft drinks, sugary foods, and fatty foods.

By working together, we can decrease obesity.

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The Healthiest (and least healthy) States In America

Every year the United Health Foundation releases its “America’s Health Rankings Report”, which ranks each and every US state from least healthy to healthiest. The rankings are determined based off the prevalence in each state of four key health issues: obesity, smoking, diabetes, and physical inactivity.

Some of the healthiest states might surprise you, and some of the least healthy states might surprise you as well! Let’s see how your state stacks up, shall we? Without further ado, here are the rankings for 2015: (spoiler alert—if you don’t have time to read all the way to the bottom, Hawaii is officially the healthiest state!)

50—Louisiana

49—Mississippi

48—Arkansas

47—West Virginia

46—Alabama

45—Oklahoma

44—Kentucky

43—Tennessee

42—South Carolina

41—Indiana

40—Georgia

39—Ohio

38—Nevada

37—New Mexico

36—Missouri

35—Michigan

34—Texas

33—Florida

32—Delaware

31—North Carolina

30—Arizona

29—Pennsylvania

28—Illinois

27—Alaska

26—Kansas

25—Wyoming

24—Wisconsin

23—Montana

22—Iowa

21—Virginia

20—Oregon

19—South Dakota

18—Maryland

17—Idaho

16—California

15—Maine

14—Rhode Island

13—New York

12—North Dakota

11—New Jersey

10—Nebraska

9—Washington

8—Colorado

7—Utah

6—Connecticut

5—New Hampshire

4—Minnesota

3—Massachusetts

2—Vermont

1—Hawaii 

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